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June 2023 Newsletter - Wellbeing



Well-being programs such as mental health support, work-life balance, peer support and physical well-being programs are of paramount importance in today‘s taxing medical environment. These programs recognize the significant challenges and pressures faced by healthcare professionals and aim to support their physical, mental, and emotional well-being.


Dear friends,


At the Shapiro Institute, we are committed to helping physicians navigate the mental and physical challenges of their stressful profession and to the creation of a supportive environment that not only benefits doctors but also leads to improved patient outcomes and overall healthcare system performance.


Well-being programs such as mental health support, work-life balance, peer support and physical well-being programs are of paramount importance in today‘s taxing medical environment. These programs recognize the significant challenges and pressures faced by healthcare professionals and aim to support their physical, mental, and emotional well-being. By addressing these aspects, well-being programs can help doctors maintain their health, improve job satisfaction, reduce burnout and simultaneously enhance patient care.


But there is an additional element to “well-being” noted by the eminent psychologist, Dr. Martin Seligman in his book, “Flourish”. Dr. Seligman distinguishes “well-being” from “wellness” which is an element of well-being. Wellness is linked to happiness and can be a somewhat transient state, easily disrupted by an adverse event. Well-being, on the other hand, reflects one’s sense of accomplishment, mastery and progress in one’s chosen field. It is more enduring and less easily disrupted than wellness. Ultimately, a strong sense of well-being contributes to resilience. An individual with a strong sense of well-being is more likely to handle challenges in one’s life and career with equanimity. With this in mind, the Shapiro Institute provides programming to enhance the capabilities of our faculty and trainees as teachers, support for those aspiring to become education scholars, and a community of educators to share their experiences and their highs and lows as medical educators and clinicians.



- Richard M. Schwartzstein, MD






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